Tuesday, 12 May 2009

SIRROMET LEADS AUSTRALIAN MARKET WITH PET BOTTLES

With claims by Fosters for an ‘Australian first' for the Wolf Blass Green Label wine, Sirromet Winery has released new figures to show their current position in the eco market.

"Sirromet released First Step, a new wine range in PET bottles, in January 2009," said Sirromet Chief Winemaker Adam Chapman. "These are the same type of bottles and the same size that Fosters is now claiming as a market first for Wolf Blass.

"Our claim is also backed by Visy, the bottle manufacturers.

"But Sirromet goes better than just PET bottles and the multitude of eco benefits they bring," said Adam. "Sirromet has reduced CO2 emissions from an industry standard of say 4 to 5 kilos of CO2per bottle of red wine down to 2.57 kilos of CO2 for First Step Cabernet Merlot.

"This has been achieved with winery machinery up grades to more efficient machinery, lowering water use, management of water metres, worm farms, liquid waste farm and chemical changes that do not effect the BOD levels in our waste plant and changing winery practises to be simply more efficient.

"First Step's PET 750ml packaging, recycled label and cartoon are the icing on our environmental cake at this stage. It really does show that we are lowering our foot print through actions, not green credits!"

Sirromet is keen to do more with wind turbines just one of the projects to help reduce the power intake for processing. The company is also looking at floating solar panels for the vineyard dams to reduce power use and water evaporation at the same time.

First Step is available via Sirromet's Cellar Door, at supportive retail outlets and online at www.sirromet.com/buywine. The wine retails for $12 per bottle.

Sirromet's Green Cred

Sirromet practices environmental sustainability in its wine making and operations. The on-site worm farm helps recycle all organic waste, from grape stems and skins to cardboard boxes, while on site rainwater collection means the Mount Cotton operation is virtually 100 percent self sufficient for water needs. Even the grey and black water is recycled on site - a true sign of serious self sufficiency.
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